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Economics

A celebrity endorsement

'That thing is going to cost about nine billion pounds. That's a lot of money to watch some guy run around a track. I could go to some gym and see that for free.'

Ozzy Osbourne

From: Quotes of the week, Sunday July 15, 2007,The Observer


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Contamination and Controversy in the Olympic Park

© Mike Wells, 0 77 99 152 888, mikejwells@yahoo.com

Synopsis

For more than a century what will be the Olympic Park was home to some of the nation’s dirtiest industries. Within, and surrounding, what will be the Olympic Park some 7,500 people were employed in the chemicals industry. A new document reveals a second case of radioactive waste dumped in 1953 in a former landfill site within the Park. An Environment Agency analysis shows higher than normal levels of radioactive material in the River Lee. The article examines the historical information available, includes quotes from experts and lawyers, and is critical of the LDA’s work in the Park, which local residents fear puts them at risk. Mike Wells is also a photographer. The article comes with photographs.


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The Prescott Channel Scam

Massimo Allamandola has at last been able to bring to my attention the report, which I have attached below, about the response in Nov 2005, by the 'Regents Network' of canal users to British Waterways proposal to impound the River Lea by building a 'Water Control Structure' at Prescott Channel.


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Clocking escalating costs

A recent e-mail dialogue from 2010WATCH in Vancouver:

Ian Gregson from 2010watch@yahoogroups.com wrote:

Protest Against Olympic ‘Countdown Clock’
Monday Feb.12th @ 12 Noon Vancouver Art Gallery


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Olympic cost estimate

THE government was rightly lambasted last week by a parliamentary committee for its mismanagement of the 2012 London Olympic finances since winning the games in July 2005. But the Eye has discovered that even as the crowds were erupting in Trafalgar Square two summers ago, the government knew the real costs bore no relation to those set out earlier that day in Lord Coe's decisive presentation to the International Olympic Committee.


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We can still win the Olympics ... by hacking it back to size

For all the hype, there are no noticeable economic benefits to the Olympics. There may be some gain to smaller cities wanting to boost their world image, such as Atlanta and Barcelona. London has no such need and the IOC has priced small cities out of the market.


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Sport as catalyst. A critique of Olympic economic development strategy

The LDA estimate that in the 'red line area' alone, somewhere between 11,000 and 12,000 jobs could be created (private conversation). Later projections are as high as 35,000 (E. Goodwyn and K Munn, October 11, 2006). However, it is clear that social actions and relationships, development plans and economic strategies, have all been defined by a discourse of uneven development, that of poverty in the Lower Lea Valley and Olympic boroughs (a continuing product).


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Chicago HOT for 2016 Olympics

At what was basically a pep rally Tuesday for the city's business elite, Mayor Richard M. Daley touted Chicago as the best city for the U.S. bid for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games.

Daley listed several reasons why Chicago should be chosen, including its position as one of the top economic centers in the world, its ability to handle large crowds, its residents' love of athletic competitions and the natural beauty of the city -- with Lake Michigan providing a backdrop for many of the events. Daley also said the Chicago proposal has the benefit of being compact. All the athletes would be located within 15 minutes of the venues where they would compete, he said.


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