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2012 Sport

Stop the world! Athletes demand 'absolute confidence' in transport

London 2012 is claiming to be holding a consultation on its transport arrangements for the Olympics. Just to emphasise the vital importance of these arrangements, despite the enormous disruption this will cause, the webpage has Olympic athlete Karen Pickering saying 'Competing at a major event is stressful and nerve-racking enough for an athlete, we don’t want to have to think about transport and getting to our venues. Every little detail counts in an athlete’s preparations. When I was competing I knew exactly what time I needed to prepare, to get changed, to do my warm up, to get changed. Athletes need absolute confidence that the transport won’t let them down and impact on getting ready to perform at their best.'


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Debate on Olympic and Paralympic Legacies

Mike Weed is Professor of Sport and Society and Director of the Centre for Sport, Physical Education and Activity Research (SPEAR) at Canterbury Christ Church University. He also engages with #media2012, and was a speaker at the recent annual olympic and paralympic conference of PODIUM, the London 2012 Further and Higher Education Unit. Republished with permission here is a piece calling for a debate around 2012 sporting legacies which he asserts has been largely absent.


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West End rubs it in - East End doesn't have marathon finish

Money talks. The East End managed to scrape together £10million to brush up its High Street for the 2012 marathon. Now the West End shows what really pulls in the likes of SebCo and his corporate buddies at Locog with a £1billion scrub up. Meanwhile threats of East End legal action have fizzled out as Tower Hamlets finally accepts its position at the back of the field.


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A cornerstone of lies

Sports Minister Hugh Robbertson has called the £135million lottery funding to be spent under the the Places People Play strategy 'the cornerstone of a grassroots legacy from hosting the Olympic Games.' As others have pointed out this comes after the coalition took away £300million sports funding, cuts which will have a particular impact on children's sport.


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Finally the lie that the Olympics will boost sports participation dies

The Government has finally given up on the idea that hosting an elite athletics event will stimulate sports participation. In September, the target of getting a million people playing some kind of sport three times a week looked certain to be missed. Of course, if the Government had listened they would have known this was never going to happen. So it looks like changing the clocks is the only policy left in the cupboard.


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Marathon mendacity

Lots in the blogosphere on Coe&Co having chosen to re-route the marathon away from East London.

This comment on Diamond Geezer is really quite touching:


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An extra hour in bed will sort out sport participation

It seems sports administrators have finally decided the Olympics and other high profile elite sports events will not inspire the nation to participate in sport. They now argue the solution is as simple as winding up the clock or at least moving the time on an hour. If we could only have an extra hour of daylight in the evening sporting success would follow. Why, we might win the World Cup and have a Wimbledon winner at last! Well, at least we could reduce the chances of hearing 'Bad light stops play' which, according to Mike Gatting, 'is one of the most frustrating sentences you can hear in a cricket context'.


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Sport participation on target - in 25 years

Amid the welter of failing Olympic Legacies come the latest figures on sport participation which show it will take 25 years for the government to reach its reduced Olympic Legacy target of getting another million people involved in sport three times a week. 14 sports actually showed a statistically significant decrease in the numbers particpating once a week. And that doesn't take into account the effect of the coming budget cuts.


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