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Regeneration

Contamination and Controversy in the Olympic Park

© Mike Wells, 0 77 99 152 888, mikejwells@yahoo.com

Synopsis

For more than a century what will be the Olympic Park was home to some of the nation’s dirtiest industries. Within, and surrounding, what will be the Olympic Park some 7,500 people were employed in the chemicals industry. A new document reveals a second case of radioactive waste dumped in 1953 in a former landfill site within the Park. An Environment Agency analysis shows higher than normal levels of radioactive material in the River Lee. The article examines the historical information available, includes quotes from experts and lawyers, and is critical of the LDA’s work in the Park, which local residents fear puts them at risk. Mike Wells is also a photographer. The article comes with photographs.


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On a clear day in Stratford…

On a clear day you can see ten tall cranes overlooking Stratford. Walk around Stratford’s mean streets and you will find new buildings going up in every corner. It is the Government’s contention, along with the Mayor of London, the LDA, the CPO Inquiry Inspector and everyone of consequence that Stratford, East London, is absolutely one of the most run down places in the United Kingdom.


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Unique albino deer herd threatened by developers in upstate New York

any rare and ultra-photogenic endangered species in Olympic lands that could aid the campaign?



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The 'success' of Barcelona

Barcelona Housing Demo October 2006Barcelona Housing Demo October 2006

From: The role of Mega events in urban competitiveness and its consequences on people, Carolina del Olmo, Universidad Complutense, Sept 2004

We are tired of hearing about the “Olympic legacy” and the official discourse is repeated again and again that when the mega-event concludes, the installations will remain in the city.


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Why did Lemley leave ?

A year ago Jack Lemley, a square-shouldered American construction baron, walked into the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to meet a sceptical press.

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