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Corruption & Ethics

Glasgow Commonwealth Games land deals under investigation

Following the eviction of the Jaconellis from their home to make way for the Glasgow Commonwealth Games questions are finally being asked about land deals which netted property developers millions of pounds in profit.

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Dow: London's 2012 Perfect Olympic Sponsor

By Mike Wells , posted 29th December 2011, edited 11th January 2012Campaigners Against DowCampaigners Against Dow

A recent sponsorship deal has seen the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games accept money from Dow Chemical. Dow will provide a fabric "wrap" which will be placed around London's Olympic stadium.

According to Britain's Guardian newspaper the wrap's purpose is to reduce wind inside the stadium.  But, as the metaphor says ...

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Witness delivers letter to Olympics Organisers on Rio Evictions

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LOCOG: paper promises, no real change

From Labour Behind The Label

As part of the Playfair 2012 campaign we've been lobbying the London Games organisers (LOCOG) to ensure workers making garments and merchandise for the Olympics have their rights respected. And on paper we've had reasonable success. But problems arise when we dig deeper.

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Dow 'mistake' could be a 'disaster'

Ted Jeory, one of the few journalists to pick up on the radioactive contamination of the London Olympic Park, has reported that London 2012 is seriously concerned at the head of steam building up in India over the deal which allowed Dow to sponsor the Olympic stadium. 'Senior sources', not just 'sources', are reported as saying the deal was a 'mistake' which it seems they are finding it difficult to wriggle out of.

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fortunes always hiding

Fantastic news for the Irons, though perhaps no better as yet for the Os. (West Ham to be the 'winter tenant'?)
Olympic Stadium deal with West Ham collapses

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Pudding Mill Stadium: property partners from hell

The raid on public funds to persuade West Ham and Tottenham football clubs to stay in their home territories has escalated to £57million with Haringey Council matching Bojo's offer of £8.5million with another £8.5million in relief for planning costs. This has drawn criticism from Spurs' courtroom allies, Leyton Orient, whose Chairman, Barry Hearn, described the offer as a 'bung'.

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