Games Monitor

Skip to main content.

Document archive

Olympic Games Impact Study for DCMS 2005

Olympic Games Impact Study: Final Report Dec 2005

Produced by Price Waterhouse Coopers for the DCMS to assess the likely national, regional and local impacts of hosting the Olympics in London.


AttachmentSize
PWC OlympicGamesImpactStudy.pdf231.54 KB

| | | | |

Hackney Wick and Fish Island Creative Industries Mapping July 2009

The social cultural and economic ecology of a place is as fragile as any other ecology. In March and April 2009 muf architecture/art commissioned by Design For London - mapped the activities and businesses of Hackney Wick. We uncovered both significant activity but also the negative repercussions of the presence of the Olympic site namely landlords unwilling to give artists and businesses (creative and otherwise) sufficiently long leases and businesses who had either left or were planning to leave.


AttachmentSize
Hackney Wick and Fish Island Creative Industries Mapping July 2009.pdf71 bytes

| |

The Fluid Survey: Clays Lane Housing Co-op Residents Survey Report

The Fluid Survey was carried out in August and September 2004. It followed two meetings at the end of November 2003 and in February 2004 at which the LDA had met with the Clays Lane community. At the first meeting the LDA had said the estate would be demolished even if the Olympics did not come to London. It had produced a drawing of a non-Olympic scenario at the meeting in November. Enquiries by residents showed that in reality there was no such non-Olympic plan and later, at the CPO Inquiry in 2006, Jason Prior, the Olympics Masterplanner, revealed in his evidence that an investigation into a non-Olympic plan for the area was not even commissioned until the summer of 2004 and was then abandoned as unviable.

The survey was originally planned for March 2004 but was postponed for reasons which are not entirely clear. There were discussions with the management of the Co-operative about which the community at large was not informed. At some point these discussions broke down.

At the meeting in November the LDA had raised the prospect of a community move and this had also been discussed with the Co-op's management committee. This possibility was included in a question in the survey. In June of 2004, Mr Winterbottom had written to residents promising that residents would receive accommodation 'as good as if not better than' we had. In the survey report, which is attached, this was changed to 'as good as in so far as is reasonably practicable'. Later these formulas were simply forgotten about and the rehousing policy made no reference to these statements. In effect these promises were meaningless. Residents just got whatever was available which in some cases was an improvement and in others a deterioration in their accommodation.

The survey was well conducted. However, when it came to the summer of 2005 after the Bid was won the LDA and its agents, Community Based Housing Association which was a branch of Peabody, produced a new survey with a few basic questions such as, which area do you want to move to, do you have a disability and is there anyone you want to move with?

The Fluid survey was never used and the questionnaires were never handed over to CBHA, the association charged with managing the relocation on behalf of the LDA. The LDA had all the results in their possession. Residents were told it was confidential to Fluid, that it was out of date and that it had only even been carried out to establish general trends. The survey makes it plain that it was designed to discover individual housing needs.

Download the Fluid Report in PDF (7Mb)


| | | | | | |

The Inspector's report into the 2012 Olympics Compulsory Purchase Order

The Inspector for the Inquiry into the 2012 Olympics Compulsory Purchase Order only produced an advisory report. The final decision was left to the Minister for Communities, then Alastair Darling, who ignored the Inspector's recommendations regarding the Travellers. There was never the remotest chance that the Inspector would not recommend acceptance and even less that Mr Darling would not grant the order. The whole process was a sham.

The Inspector paid next to no attention to the evidence from Clays Lane residents. He preferred the information provided by the LDA on future housing costs even though in the event the Clays Lane residents' evidence was far more accurate and should have been seen to be so at the time. The Inspector also refused to carry out any detailed examination of claims by the LDA for example regarding the alleged Housing Legacy from the Athletes' Village. At one point he simply reproduces the figures provided by the LDA while later he refers to disputes about the amount of housing which would be produced. He could easily have resolved the matter with some elementary calculations which would have included the housing that was to be lost at Clays Lane and Park Village and the amount of housing to be built at Stratford City and used for the Athletes' Village. This housing was not Legacy housing as it was going to be built anyway.


AttachmentSize
Inspectors recommendation to Secretary of State-3875798-1.pdf1.38 MB

| | | | | | | |

UCL Study: Hackney Marsh - Catalyst for Social Cohesions and Transformative Changes

Collaborative study by a group of masters’ students, mostly international, taking the MSc Environment and Sustainable Development at the Development Planning Unit – University College London.

The study, based on fieldwork undertaken in 2008, set out to

"establish the experiences, needs and expectations regarding the access to, use and appropriation of the green spaces, specifically Hackney Marshes, by the communities in the Hackney Wick Estate and Surroundings. Furthermore, we wanted to determine how the changes brought by the 2012 Olympic Games could affect the possibility of enhancing environmental justice and social inclusion in the use of the Hackney Marsh."

Based on their research it seems that the £10m being spent on redevelopment of the Marshes is unlikely to provide much of value for this part of the local community, and that the changes have been mismanaged

"It became apparent that current plans for the area and planned changes introduced as part of the Legacy of the Olympic Games will not sufficiently enhance environmental justice and social inclusion in the use of the Marsh and will not meet the expectation of the residents in the Hackney Wick area"

"Communities in Hackney Wick are directly affected by the physical erection of the Olympic Games. Many communities in these areas also appear to be current non-users of the Marsh, and are not expecting to benefit from the Legacy changes to the Marshes, and so will not be benefiting from the allocation of compensation for their environmental burdens."

"Barriers and feelings of disempowerment appear to have been enhanced by the current management of the Olympics, particularly in the sale of common land to the LDA without public participation and the apparent tokenistic level of participation in consultation process"


AttachmentSize
UCL - Hackney Marsh - Catalyst for Social Cohesions and Transformative Changes.pdf1.21 MB

| | |

GLA Committe Report into The Legacy of London's Olympic Venues, September 2010

Report by the London Assembly Economic Development, Culture, Sport and Tourism Committee, Legacy United? The Legacy of London's Olympic Venues.

Focuses on the Legacy uses of the Main Stadium and the Media Centre.


| |

ODA Programme Baseline Report Sep 09

The purpose of this Programme Delivery Baseline report is to provide a summary of
the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) Programme, including scope, schedule, budget
and risk as at 30 September 2009.

A lot of useful information if you want to get behind the spin and have some grasp of what's actually going on.
ODA Programme Delivery Baseline Summary Report September 2009


|

Vancouver 2010 expenses report

Vancouver2010_expenses.pdf

City of Vancouver releases Olympic expenses

Wednesday, April 14, 2010 by David Eby
http://davideby.blogspot.com/2010/04/city-of-vancouver-releases-olympic.html

The City has just released a report outlining Olympic expenses. The costs are intense, especially when you realize that our school board is scraping by trying to find $20m to cut from already overburdened classrooms.

The total Olympic costs to the City of Vancouver were $729.2m with $554.3 of that cost bone by the City directly. $61m was for operations, and $668m for capital expenditures.

View the report here [PDF], it's not currently on the City's website.


| |

Missed the Goal for Workers: The Reality of Soccer Ball Stitchers in Pakistan, India, China and Thailand

An International Labor Rights Forum report, June 7, 2010

This report presents the key findings of the International Labor Rights Forum’s research in the four largest soccer balls producing countries: Pakistan, India, China and Thailand. This report also highlights the need to rethink the strategies being utilized by companies to encourage suppliers to adhere to strong labor standards.

The 2010 World Cup presents a golden business opportunity for soccer ball companies. During the 2006 World Cup, Adidas’revenue in the soccer category increased more than US $800 million. However, these business opportunities may come at the expense of workers in factories, stitching centers and homes globally to produce soccer balls. Over a decade ago, the world was shocked by reports that Pakistani children were stitching soccer balls for six cents an hour. In response to the media frenzy and public outrage, companies, governments, and other stakeholders committed to eliminating child labor in the industry by supporting the 1997 Atlanta Agreement which aimed to end child labor within the soccer ball industry.

Thirteen years later, with the 2010 World Cup hosted by South Africa just around the corner, it is time to ask what, if any, improvements have been made for workers that produce the most important symbol of the game: the soccer ball.


AttachmentSize
ILRF_soccerball_report.pdf730.5 KB

| | |

Olympic Park Design Wind Turbine Feasibility Report

The East Marsh site, to be used as a temporary coach park during Games, also contains two feasible locations for a further turbine (only one turbine is possible due to limitations on turbine proximity with respect to other turbines), subject to flood risk assessment. Figure 2 shows a constraints diagram for this area produced by Ecotricity. BH/EDAW have identified two specific locations within this area which are suitable for wind turbines
based on the planned Legacy use.
[Figure 2 – Feasible turbine locations on East Marsh]
The location of a wind turbine on East Marsh is likely to be more contentious than the Eton Manor site as, although it is further from dwellings, it would affect the landscape character of Hackney Marshes in a more direct manner. Additionally this site is designated as an Important Bird Area (IBA). There are 287 of these sites in the UK. Early consultation with RSPB and other stakeholders as well as a full programme of bird monitoring will be required.

Above is an excerpt from Section 4 - Further Turbines from Olympic Park Design Wind Turbine Feasibility Report Revision 01 November 2006 © Buro Happold Limited (Page 11 of 25). It shows that the possibilty for a second turbine on East Marsh was under consideration prior to the 2007 Planning Application which featured only the single turbine on the 'Eton Manor' site.


| | | | | | | |

Olympic Sports, Spirits and Stories - Hilary Powell

"With every large scale master-planning exercise comes a grand narrative of
regeneration, with every Olympics comes the weight of the ‘Olympic Story’ and with
every map or plan comes a legend. As 2012 approaches and the increasingly
contentious issues and ideas of legacy come to the fore enchanting tales of the future
are woven and mapped onto the East London Olympic development site. Amid this
spinning of stories, the aims of this article is to give voice to the smaller stories,
miniscule myths and histories of the area that examine, intervene in and puncture the
utopian myth of progress inherent in the Olympic development - counteracting tabula
rasa urbanism and questioning the dystopian reality of such visionary projects."

Published in Critical Cities: Ideas, Knowledge and Agitation from
Emerging Urbanists
, Myrdle Court Press London (A ‘This Is Not A Gateway’
Publication)


AttachmentSize
HPowellOlympicStories.pdf410.15 KB

|

Report of Bird Counts at East Marsh and Eton Manor 2008

This report presents the results of 12 month bird counts at Eton Manor and East Marsh during 2008 undertaken to inform the impact assessments of the proposed Olympic wind turbines.

Contrary to the claims made by Jules Pipe / Hackney Council, it does NOT conclude that an 'Olympic' wind turbine on East Marsh would not affect the area's bird population. It confirms that large numbers of birds of 72 species regularly pass through the area affected by the wind turbine proposals at Eton Manor and East Marsh. 11 species of conservation concern including 8 protected species were recorded. These will be vulnerable to disturbance and have already suffered habitat disruption and loss of nesting sites through the Olympic development. A diagram of flight directions of flocks shows them passing close to the proposed turbine locations.

The report states that "Wind turbines have the potential to have negative impacts on birds" but "This is a report of the baseline bird observation survey, and is not an assessment of any impacts.".


AttachmentSize
REP EDW TG ZZZ ZZZ ZZZ O 0001 P02 11.pdf411.39 KB

| |

European Tour Operators Association critiques of alleged tourism benefits from hosting the Olympics

'There appears to be little evidence of any benefit to tourism of hosting an Olympic Games, and considerable evidence of damage.' Findings of the European Tour Operators Association 2006 Report and Updates from 2008 and 2009.

Taken from the 2006 Report:

'The tourism industry is often singled out as the principal beneficiary. This study explores the extent to which this is valid.

It looks at sporting events and tourism, the television audience and the impact of hosting the Olympic Games on a city’s tourism infrastructure. It ends with studies of Barcelona and Sydney: cities that have had ostensibly “good” games for tourism.

The primary purpose of this study is to generate debate. It shows that there is no strong link between hosting sporting events and increased tourism. The audiences regularly cited for such events as the Olympics are exaggerated. Attendees at the Games displace normal visitors and scare tourists away for some time. Both Sydney and Barcelona had “excellent” Olympic Games, but their tourism industries have not significantly benefited.

Thus there appears to be little evidence of any benefit to tourism of hosting an Olympic Games, and considerable evidence of damage. It is vital that the problems experienced by the host cities of past Games be acknowledged and addressed in order to avoid them reoccurring.'


AttachmentSize
ETOA Olympic Report 2006.pdf247.37 KB
ETOAOlympicReportUpdate2008.pdf235.49 KB
ETOA Olympic Report update 2009.pdf79.83 KB

| | | | |

Olympic Sized Lies: Leaflet for the London Olympics

Olympic Sized Lies and 2012 London Sized Lies:- A leaflet about the 2012 London Olympics


AttachmentSize
Olympic Sized Lies leaflet.doc33.5 KB

|

'Game Plan' UK Government Report on the London Bid for the 2012 Olympic Games

'Game Plan' a joint Department of Culture, Media and Sport and Strategy Unit Report published in December 2002 which examined policy on Sport while the government was thinking about bidding for the Olympics in 2012. It was signed off by Tony Blair who wrote the foreword.

Of Mega Events the report stated in its Executive Summary:

'Mega sporting events: there should be a more cautious approach to hosting these events. A set process for government involvement, including a clear assessment of the benefits is needed.'

The report expressed considerable scepticism about the benefits of hosting mega events, see chapter 2. The government went ahead with the 2012 Olympics anyway.

Download the Game Plan Report


|

REAP project details FOI request

Request to London Borough of Hackney for details of successful REAP (Recreation and Environment Action Plan) projects.
REAP is an LDA-funded scheme providing £1m for improvements to green spaces and community and sports facilities in Hackney's neighbourhoods closest to the Olympic site.

Response received 29 Oct 2008:

>Project Number

Name

Organisation

Project Description

>1

Linzell Estate

Hackney Homes Limited

To regenerate dilapidated green

spaces within Linzell Estate. It is proposed to remove poorly planted,

maintained or vandalised vegetation and undertake their replacement with new

high amenity plants with high ecological value. There are also plans to plant

a number of trees, to provide a habitat and food for birds and insects.

>2

Sherry's Wharf Estate

Hackney Homes Limited

To regenerate dilapidated green

spaces within Sherry's Wharf Estate. It is proposed to remove poorly planted,

maintained or vandalised vegetation and undertake their replacement with new

high amenity plants with high ecological value. There are also plans to plant

a number of trees, to provide a habitat and food for birds and insects.

>3

Trowbridge Estate

Hackney Homes Limited

To regenerate dilapidated green

spaces within Trowbridge Estate. It is proposed to remove poorly planted,

maintained or vandalised vegetation and undertake their replacement with new

high amenity plants with high ecological value. There are also plans to plant

a number of trees, to provide a habitat and food for birds and insects.

>4

Herbert Butler Estate

Hackney Homes Limited

To regenerate dilapidated green

spaces within Herbert Butler Estate. It is proposed to remove poorly planted,

maintained or vandalised vegetation and undertake their replacement with new

high amenity plants with high ecological value. There are also plans to plant

a number of trees, to provide a habitat and food for birds and insects.

>5

Gascoyne 1 Estate

Hackney Homes Limited

To regenerate dilapidated green

spaces within Gascoyne Estate. It is proposed to remove poorly planted,

maintained or vandalised vegetation and undertake their replacement with new

high amenity plants with high ecological value. There are also plans to plant

a number of trees, to provide a habitat and food for birds and insects.

>6

Hackney Quest Playground - Poole

Road

Hackney Quest

To refurbish the disused

playground adjacent to 1 Poole Road. This project would like to install

suitable lighting, security CCTV and complete a mural on two walls with an

Olympic theme. In addition, two benches will be installed for local people

and children.

>7

Buxhall Crsecent and Red Path

Improvements

Newlon Housing Association

To improve the amenity and

biodiversity value of 500m2 of land at buxhall crescent, support protected

species of consveration concern and take advantage of opportunities for

ecological enhancement.

>8

Volunteering Support

Hackney Voluntary Action (HVA)

This organisation will work with

Hackney Council to offer assistance with monitoring. It will identify

volunteers that can help to deliver projects and/ or help maintain them.

These volunteers include young people who will help in the development of open

spaces as well as volunteers who can help applicants in the preliminary

stages of costing and designing their schemes.

>9

Bushberry Road/Benn Street Play

Area

Hackney Homes Limited

To replace the existing,

dilapidated and vandalised play equipment with new play equipment which

complies with the laws and other requirements for these structures, more

robust and longer lasting which will encompass the needs of our catchment

area. This project includes the installation of a complete new safety

surface, disability access pathway and more appropriate play equipment to

meet the needs of the local community.

>10

Mandeville Community Primary

School Playground

Mandeville Community Primary

School

To create a landscaped garden,

vegetable garden, seating areas, recycling and wildlife areas, helping

children to enjoy, learn and understand about wildlife, plant life, nature,

recycling and healthy eating.

>11

Trowbridge Centre Garden

London Borough of Hackney

To regenerate the community garden

next to the trowbridge centre

>12

Pedro Street Community Garden

Clapton Park Tenant Management

Organisation

This project will replace a

concrete disused public area of paving located at Pedro Street on Clapton

Park Estate with a well-designed landscaped green area containing public herb

beds, raised beds for use on joint initiative between the T.M.O., the

grounds' maintenance contractor and local community groups, trees and trellis

work.

>13

Green' Gilpin Square

Clapton Park Tenant Management

Organisation

To turn Gilpin Square into a

'Green Square' by creating a highly visible, environmentally friendly,

landscaped feature at the heart of the estate using sustainable materials and

a mixture of planting. This will be done with new and existing plants, creating

a new water feature and improving the seating areas.

>14

Millfields Road Environmental

Improvements

Clapton Park Tenant Management

Organisation

This project will replace a

concreted disused public space facing out onto the main through road within

the Clapton Park area (Millfields Road/ Mandeville Street). This area will be

landscaped and a seating area will be provided. The seating will have a

backdrop of naturalistic planting and dense shrubbery will provide a sound

barrier as well as acting as a security barrier.

>15

Bike Project

The Bike Project Community

Cooperative Limited

To create a centre for cycling and

recycling related activities including cycle maintenance and training of

mechanics, earn-a-bike schemes, cycle skills training, cycle recycling. There

will be a strong focus on youth involvement and the development of links with

the wider community within the locality. It will also regenerate a currently

empty and neglected area.

>16

Well Street Common Improvements

Well Street Common User Group

To improve the access and amenity

of Well Street Common for the local community by promoting sport and fitness,

encouraging enjoyment and relaxation and creating a high quality environment

in the Common.

>17

Daubeney School Play Equipment

Daubeney Primary School

To bring sports and fun into the

community by offering them an exciting and challenging play area. If the

project is successful, then the local health club Energie will be invited to

create a fitness programme for the children. This will help children in the

community to be active during the holidays as well as during school time.

>18

Olympic Themed Mobile Sports and

Play Activity

Albion Kids Show

To deliver a planned and

structured series of mobile sports sessions on 4 Housing Estates - Wick,

Trowbridge, Kingsmead and Herbert Butler during Easter and summer 2008.

Qualified coaches and playworkers will introduce children aged 5-16 years to

more than 20 Olympic sports and games. Long Term Athletic Development (LATD),

Game Skills, visualisation, plyometrics, play and co-operative games,

obstacle courses and roleplay to improve young people's physical literacy.

>19

Gainsborough School Landscaping

Gainsborough Community Primary

School

To redevelop the infant playground

which is currently a tarmac wasteland overlooked by Wick Village housing

estate and is

>20

Daubeney Green to the Marshes

Groundwork East London

There are three objectives for

this project. One is a linear tree planting project, bringing a green 'chain'

across from the Wick Woodland, bounding the main Hackney Marsh and visually

linking up with the Daubeney Green site on the opposite site of the River Lee

Navigation. The second is to continue the signage links over the footbridge

on the River Lee Navigation and onto Daubeney Green. The third is

biodiversity enhancements.

>21

Astroturf Shelter and Lighting

Hackney Wick Community Association

The outside area of the Hackney

Wick Community Centre needs to be developed in order to make it a safe

environment for all users. This would include an outside shelter for

inclement weather, outside lighting as well as a number of CCTV cameras. The

existing facilities such as the Astroturf and other play and garden area

would be able to be offered later in the winter evenings.

>22

Litter, Graffiti and Recycling

Promotion

Eco Active

This proposal has two parts. One

part is for students to investigate the impact of litter and graffiti on the

quality of the local environment and to make a DVD about it. The second part

is to work with a class of students to design a feature for their school

grounds, which is visible from the streets, which will advertise recycling to

their local community.

>23

Community Garden

Core Arts

To create a permanent landmark

sculptural legacy in a park of benefit to 20,000 residents living in an

identified area of social deprivation and physical environmental need. A

specific objective of this project is to offer a new activity that provides

physical and creative challenges to people who suffer from severe and

enduring mental ill health.

>24

Hackney Marsh Adventure Playground

The Learning Trust

This project is to enable the

outdoor area of Hackney Marsh Playground to be developed and used more

effectively. This work will include the playground structures to be

completely removated and/ or rebuilt in consultation with local children as

well as being made as accessible as possible for children with disabilities.

A new fence and landscaping of the outdoor area are also intended.


| |

London Borough of Hackney information regarding Iain Sinclair book launch cancellation

This is a text version of the original PDF response from London Borough of Hackney made available at whatdotheyknow.com - email addresses and phone numbers have been removed.

Anna Robinson to Ted Rogers: 21/08/08 by email.

Right - the new book is called Hackney: That Rose-Red Empire - he describes it as a 'work of documentary fiction'. It is essentially a work of love about Hackney - and I guess someones got to...

The Olympics Scam is a piece for the London Review of Books - viewable on their website, which if you read it you'll see is nowhere near as rude about the Olympics as it might sound. There is one paragraph that highlights the encroachment by developers onto the marshes and other than that he only says that the relationship between government and developers is like "Dr Frankenstein with a Google Earth program and a remote-control laser scalpel." -which you've got to admit is true and very funny!

As I've been discussing doing this with him for ages - pulling it as contraversial is not something he won't comment on and that will be far harder to deal with than a bit of digging at the developers (and it is them - not the sports persons that he is commenting on!)

Anna Robinson

Reader Development Manager

Hackney Libraries


 

From: Edward Rogers

Sent: 21 August 2008 12:24

T
o: Anna Robinson; Anita Kane

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair

Thanks, both. I'll have a word with Comms later.

Incidentally, I'm chuffed to bits about this festival. He's an internationally renowned author and I think it's a major coup for us to be able to launch one of his books

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney


 

From: Anita Kane

Sent: 21 August 2008 13:46

To: Edward Rogers; Anna Robinson

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair

Hear hear!!


From: Edward Rogers

Sent: 21 August 2008 13:50

To: Anita Kane; Anna Robinson; Anita Kane; Anna Robinson

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair

Nevertheless, don't have any discussions with anybody outside the Council until I've had a chance to talk to Communications

Thanks

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney


From: Anna Robinson

Sent: 28 August 2008 17:03

To: Edward Rogers

Subject: iain Sinclair - again

The writer I'm sure I was told was a former Hackney leader - wasn't - it is Ken Worpole and he is one of the people that set up Centerprise.

Anna Robinson

Reader Development Manager

Hackney Libraries

I am reading Living With Honour: a pagan ethic by Emma Restell Orr


 

Of course

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney


 

From: Anna Robinson

Sent: 28 August 2008 15:42

To: Edward Rogers

Subject: Iain Sinclair presents:

So - the idea is lain Sinclair chooses a number of writers/artists to present in celebration of his long awaited Hackney Book. The gallery is the venue - an exhibition of art by artists chosen by Sinclair - will run throughout.

Proposed events: Exhibition private view, book launch for 'Hackney, That Rose-Red Empire' -organised in collaboration with Penguin Books, book launch for re-publication of Patrick Wright's book - A Journey Through Ruins - organised in collaboration with OUP, - other events not as yet fixed but could include Stewart Home, Nicola Barker, Will Self, Sebastian Bell and/or Nigel Fountain - all of whom are writers Sinclair is friendly with and has mentioned in the new book. Doing a literary walk in collaboration with Archives and poet Jude Rosen is another probable event.

I am at the stage of having had a number of discussions with Iain Sinclair and with Anna Ridley of Penguin Books - so we are on course to having things pretty settled. My own schedule is that I would be getting IS to pin down who he'd like to ask to read/exhibit the week after next and preparing it for artwork by the end of September - early October at the latest

Anna Robinson

Reader Development Manager, Hackney Libraries


 

Extract from notes of 1-1 meeting Kim Wright/Nicola Baker:

Ian Sinclair

KW to raise with Ben, once NB has provided the background briefing.


From: Edward Rogers

Sent: 08 September 2008 09:21

To: Anna Robinson

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair presents:

Anna

Have you got a spare 20 minutes this afternoon when we can discuss making a case for this?

Thanks

Ted


From: Anna Robinson

Sent: 08 September 2008 09:32

To: Edward Rogers

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair presents:

My place or yours!


From: Edward Rogers

Sent: 08 September 2008 09:59

To: Anna Robinson

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair presents:

Can you do 3pm here?

Thanks

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information, London Borough of Hackney


 

From: Anna Robinson

Sent: 08 September 2008 10:05

To: Edward Rogers

Subject: RE: Iain Sinclair presents:

Yes - see you then

Anna Robinson

Reader Development Manager, Hackney Libraries

Thanks

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney


 

From: Edward Rogers

Sent: 17 September 2008 12:33

To: Nicola Baker; Nicola Baker

Subject: Iain Sinclair

Let me know what you think

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney

 

Attachment:

lain Sinclair book launch - risk analysis

The launch of Iain Sinclair's latest book 'Hackney that Red Rose Empire' is scheduled to take place at Stoke Newington Library in March 2009. Sinclair is a local author of national status who has lived near London Fields for most of his life. Starting his career as a novelist and poet, his latest genre is psycho-geography - a study of the more colourful aspects of society, architecture and topography in a specified area, and his interest is in London and specifically Hackney. Sinclair's writing is often abrasive, questioning and anti-establishment, although he also celebrates the idiosyncratic and diverse nature of London society.

Hackney Libraries have been in contact with the publishers, Penguin, over the arrangements for the launch, and a week in March 2009 has tentatively been agreed.

There are a number of risks associated with going ahead with the event, and others in stopping it at this stage.

Risks in going ahead with the event:

• The pre-publication statement on Amazon includes Once an Arcadian suburb of grand houses, orchards and conservatories, Hackney declined into a zone of asylums, hospitals and dirty industry. Persistently revived,reinvented, betrayed, it has become a symbol of inner-city chaos, crime and poverty. Now, the Olympics, a final attempt to clamp down on a renegade spirit, seeks to complete the process: erasure disguised as 'progress'.

• The book may contain criticism of London Borough of Hackney or its actions. It is possible that a high profile event such as this may be attended by the press and the fact that the book was launched in an London Borough of Hackney building could lead to adverse publicity. Whilst this is likely to be only reported locally, there is a small chance that it could be reported in the national press.

• The book is likely to contain criticism of the 2012 Olympics, and the 'gentrification' process that Sinclair throughout east London. It is possible some observers may perceive an implied support of these views.

• Given the high number of media professionals who live in the borough, the event is likely to get a good deal of publicity.

• It is possible that Sinclair sees the event as an opportunity to embarrass the council. However, given his support for Hackney Libraries in the past, and the involvement of Penguin who have a vested interest in not offending a library authority, this is not likely.

Risks in cancelling the event

• Sinclair is a local author, and has links with other local authors. Hackney Libraries is well supported by local authors but any act that could be viewed as censorship is likely to damage this relationship. There is a strong likelihood that Sinclair will be able to broker other author events at Hackney Libraries - for example Nicola Barker, Will Self and Stewart Home, all of whom are friends of Sinclair and have Hackney connections.

• Sinclair has supported Hackney Libraries in the past by appearing at. the Write to Ignite literature festival. At the last festival he steered the debate away from comments made by a member of the audience which were critical of the Dalston development back to the discussion of literature.

• Sinclair is a major author. A launch of this nature will raise the profile of Hackney Libraries, and increase the credibility of the service. Given the high number of media professionals who live in the borough, the event is likely to get a good deal of publicity.

• Sinclair is ideally placed to portray the Council in a bad light if the event were cancelled, and he suspected that his voice was being censored. He has access to publicity at a national level and there is a high risk that he would use a national platform (for example Radio 4's Front Row) to voice his criticism both of the cancellation and of his perception of why the event was cancelled.

• Cancellation of a library event on the grounds of the legal content of a work runs contrary both the ethics of the profession and to the principle of the Stock Acquisition Policy which states that Hackney will adhere to the CHIP Policy on Intellectual Freedom and Censorship.

Recommendation

Clearly there are risks associated with both running and cancelling the event. However, both the likelihood and consequences of the risks from cancelling are higher. It is therefore recommended that the event be run.


 

From: Edward Rogers

Sent: 17 September 2008 12:38

To: Nicola Baker; Nicola Baker

Subject: Iain Sinclair

Correct version attached

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney

lain Sinclair book launch - risk analysis

The launch of lain Sinclair's latest book 'Hackney that Red Rose Empire' is scheduled to take place at Stoke Newington Library in March 2009. Sinclair is a local author of national status who has lived near London Fields for most of his life. Starting his career as a novelist and poet, his latest genre is psycho-geography - a study of the more colourful aspects of society, architecture and topography in a specified area, and his interest is in London and specifically Hackney. Sinclair's writing is often abrasive, questioning and anti-establishment, although he also celebrates the idiosyncratic and diverse nature of London society.

Hackney Libraries have been in contact with the publishers, Penguin, over the arrangements for the launch, and a week in March 2009 has tentatively been agreed.

There are a number of risks associated with going ahead with the event, and others in stopping it at this stage.

Risks in going ahead with the event:

• The pre-publication statement on Amazon includes Once an Arcadian suburb of grand houses, orchards and conservatories, Hackney declined into a zone of asylums, hospitals and dirty industry. Persistently revived, reinvented, betrayed, it has become a symbol of inner-city chaos, crime and poverty. Now, the Olympics, a final attempt to clamp down on a renegade spirit, seeks to complete the process: erasure disguised as 'progress'.

• The book may contain criticism of London Borough of Hackney or its actions. It is possible that a high profile event such as this may be attended by the press and the fact that the book was launched in an London Borough of Hackney building could lead to adverse publicity. Whilst this is likely to be only reported locally, there is a small chance that it could be reported in the national press.

• The book is likely to contain criticism of the 2012 Olympics, and the 'gentrification' process that Sinclair throughout east London. It is possible some observers may perceive an implied support of these views.

• Given the high number of media professionals who live in the borough, the event is likely to get a good deal of publicity.

• It is possible that Sinclair sees the event as an opportunity to embarrass the council. However, given his support for Hackney Libraries in the past, and the involvement of Penguin who have a vested interest in not offending a library authority, this is not likely.

Risks in cancelling the event

• Sinclair is a local author, and has links with other local authors. Hackney Libraries is well supported by local authors but any act that could be viewed-as censorship is likely to damage this relationship. There is a strong likelihood that Sinclair will be able to broker other author events at Hackney Libraries - for example Nicola Barker, Will Self and Stewart Home, all of whom are friends of Sinclair and have Hackney connections.

• Sinclair has supported Hackney Libraries in the past by appearing at the Write to Ignite literature festival. At the last festival he steered the debate away from comments made by a member of the audience which were critical of the Daiston development back to the discussion of literature.

• Sinclair is a major author. A launch of this nature will raise the profile of Hackney Libraries, and increase the credibility of the service. Given the high number of media professionals who live in the borough, the event is likely to get a good deal of publicity.

• Sinclair is ideally placed to portray the Council in a bad light if the event were cancelled, and he suspected that his voice was being censored. He has access to publicity at a national level and there is a high risk that he would use a national platform (for example Radio 4's Front Row) to voice his criticism both of the cancellation and of his perception of why the event was cancelled.

• Cancellation of a library event on the grounds of the legal content of a work runs contrary both the ethics of the profession and to the principle of the Stock Acquisition Policy which states that Hackney will adhere to the CILIP Policy on Intellectual Freedom and Censorship. This policy has been signed off by the Lead Member for Culture.

Recommendation

Clearly there are risks associated with both running and cancelling the event. However, both the likelihood and consequences of the risks from cancelling are higher. It is therefore recommended that the event be run.


 

From: Nicola Baker

Sent: 17 September 2008 12:49

To: Kim Wright

Subject: Iain Sinclair book launch

Kim

Following our discussions last week I attach a risk analysis of the proposed book launch. Please let me know how you would like us to proceed.

Nicola

Nicola Baker

Assistant Director- Culture, London Borough of Hackney

lain Sinclair book launch - risk analysis

The launch of lain Sinclair's latest book 'Hackney that Red Rose Empire' is scheduled to take place at Stoke Newington Library in March 2009. Sinclair is a local author of national status who has lived near London Fields for most of his life. Starting his career as a novelist and poet, his latest genre is psycho-geography - a study of the more colourful aspects of society, architecture and topography in a specified area, and his interest is in London and specifically Hackney. Sinclair's writing is often abrasive, questioning and anti-establishment, although he also celebrates the idiosyncratic and diverse nature of London society.

Hackney Libraries have been in contact with the publishers, Penguin, over the arrangements for the launch, and a week in March 2009 has tentatively been agreed.

There are a number of risks associated with going ahead with the event, and others in stopping it at this stage.

Risks in going ahead with the event:

• The pre-publication statement on Amazon includes Once an Arcadian suburb of grand houses, orchards and conservatories, Hackney declined into a zone of asylums, hospitals and dirty industry. Persistently revived, reinvented, betrayed, it has become a symbol of inner-city chaos, crime and poverty. Now, the Olympics, a final attempt to clamp down on a renegade spirit, seeks to complete the process: erasure disguised as 'progress'.

• The book may contain criticism of London Borough of Hackney or its actions. It is possible that a high profile event such as this may be attended by the press and the fact that the book was launched in an London Borough of Hackney building could lead to adverse publicity. Whilst this is likely to be only reported locally, there is a small chance that it could be reported in the national press.

• The book is likely to contain criticism of the 2012 Olympics, and the 'gentrification' process that Sinclair throughout east London. It is possible some observers may perceive an implied support of these views.

• Given the high number of media professionals who live In the borough, the event is likely to get a good deal of publicity.

• It is possible that Sinclair sees the event as an opportunity to embarrass the council. However, given his support for Hackney Libraries in the past, and the involvement of Penguin who have a vested interest in not offending a library authority, this is not likely.

Risks in cancelling the event

• Sinclair is a local author, and has links with other local authors. Hackney Libraries is well supported by local authors but any act that could be viewed as censorship is likely to damage this relationship. There is a strong likelihood that Sinclair will be able to broker other author events at Hackney Libraries - for example Nicola Barker, Will Self and Stewart Home, all of whom are friends of Sinclair and have Hackney connections.

• Sinclair has supported Hackney Libraries in the past by appearing at the Write to Ignite literature festival. At the last festival he steered the debate away from comments made by a member of the audience which were critical of the Dalston development back to the discussion of literature.

• Sinclair is a major author. A launch of this nature will raise the profile of Hackney Libraries, and increase the credibility of the service. Given the high number of media professionals who live in the borough, the event is likely to get a good deal of publicity.

• Sinclair is ideally placed to portray the Council in a bad light if the event were cancelled, and he suspected that his voice was being censored. He has access to publicity at a national level and there is a high risk that he would use a national platform (for example Radio 4's Front Row) to voice his criticism both of the cancellation and of his perception of why the event was cancelled.

• Cancellation of a library event on the grounds of the legal content of a work runs contrary both the ethics of the profession and to the principle of the Stock Acquisition Policy which states that Hackney will adhere to the CILIP Policy on Intellectual Freedom and Censorship. This policy has been signed off by the Lead Member for Culture.

Recommendation

Clearly there are risks associated with both running and cancelling the event. However, both the likelihood and consequences of the risks from cancelling are higher. It is therefore recommended that the event be run.


 

From: Polly Rance

Sent: 22 September 2008 17:03

To: James Willsher

Subject: RE: Two things

Firstly, I think we should inform lain Sinclair's publishers (via library services) that with apologies we will be unable to host the book launch in one of the borough's libraries but would be happy to suggest alternative private venues in the borough such as independent bookshops. If then pushed for a reason we will say that we do not wish it to appear that Hackney Council condones or endorses the content of the book which is in direct contradiction to our stated aims and policies around the 2012 legacy. If Sinclair decides to take it to media we will then respond in an appropriately robust fashion.

Polly Rance

Head of Media and Externa! Relations London Borough of Hackney


 

From: Polly Rance

Sent: 24 September 2008 22:33

To: Nicola Baker

Cc: Kim Wright

Subject: RE:

Dear Nicola

We clearly need to find a solution to this issue and I appreciate your concerns. It is clear that we cannot allow the event to go ahead. I have discussed this with The Mayor and his direction was clear. He feels, as do I, that we should not host an event on Council premises promoting a book which has an overtly contraversial and political (albeit non-party) agenda, and actively promotes an opinion which contradicts our aims and values as an organisation - in this case the 2012 games and legacy, which Sinclair's book will seek to 'expose' as a con being perpetrated on the people of the East End. My suggestion via James was that we write to the publishers and let them know that we feel it would be inappropriate for the Council to host the event, but offer to assist them by suggesting other local venues such as independent book shops. If pushed we can explain that we do not wish it to appear that the Council is in anyway condoning or endorsing the content of Sinclair's book. I have discussed the potential PR ramifications of this with Jules and he is comfortable with this approach, in that it is honest, straightforward and a position he would feel comfortable defending.

I am aware that Sinclair is a highly respected writer who has written for many years about Hackney, and there is clearly a certain appeal to his particular brand of urban romanticism, but I just don't think we can square this circle.

Please let me know if you have any further concerns about our suggested approach.

All the best

Polly


 

From: "Nicola Baker"

To: "Kim Wright"

Sent: 1/10/08 9:26 AM

Subject: FW:

Kim

It would be very helpful to have a final position on this by the end of the week if at all possible please.

Nicola


 

From: Kim Wright

Sent: 01 October 2008 09:49

To: Nicola Baker

Subject: RE:

it's a non runner I'm afraid


 

From: Nicola Baker

Sent: 01 October 2008 09:49

To: Edward Rogers

Subject: Iain Sinclair

Kim has come back with a negative. Sorry.

Nicola Baker

Assistant Director; Culture London Borough of Hackney


 

OK. I will deal with this

Ted

Interim Head of Libraries, Archives and Information London Borough of Hackney

 


| |